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> Dawn Star slipped her dock lines at 11:50, not to return to the United States until some undetermined point in the future. Friends and family were dockside to cheer us on. To start our voyage off, a short ceremony was held in the cockpit and tot of rum was poured over the side to toast Old Man Neptune, who we hope will speed us to the finish ahead of our competition.
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> After a safety briefing and a review of the medical supply kit, we set the main'sl and got under sail at last. Weeks of preparation are now behind us and the only task at hand is to sail the boat as hard and as best as we can for the next few weeks.
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> The weather was sunny and bright, spectator boats of all shapes and sizes crowded the starting line as the preparatory gun fired at precisely 13:50. The port side of the one was heavily favored and the fleet jockeyed for position as the minutes ticked by. It became clear that everyone wanted a port tack approach and as the committee boat gun fired the one minute signal, boats were wheeling about to begin their final approach to the starting line. We spun the boat about and found our lane just above the British Army's boat, but they had more speed and came up underneath us calling for us to keep clear. We let them go by and settled into our own lane, hitting the starting line on time but not quite up to full speed. As the fleet left the starting area, Carina had won the favored end, with the rest of us nipping at her heels.
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> As the afternoon wore on, the winds became lighter and a fog bank rolled in, cutting off visibility to a mere 200 yards. And so we've begun our voyage; fair and sunny one moment, and gray and gloomy the next. As long as we have enough wind to keep Dawn Star moving, we'll make The Lizard eventually.
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