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> We sailed in the fog all last night, and are still sailing in the fog at this point. We had a couple of squalls last night, one went right over the boat with a drenching downpour that lasted around 20 minutes. If you were lucky enough to be on the port watch, you got to sleep to the pleasant sound of rain drumming on the deck; if you were on the starboard watch, you got wet, [read the following like Elmer Fudd] verwie, verwie wet.
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> We're not happy about our northern route not panning out as planned. The low we expected to speed us along passed us by and the high that replaced it has left us a bit behind our competition for now, but lots can happen in the many miles to come so we're just sailing the boat as fast as we can while enjoying life aboard.
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> There's a freedom that comes with being on the open ocean that combines well with the routine of shipboard life. Once you've left the hectic, non-stop, always connected life on the hard behind you have time to think about anything that comes to mind. The long list of all the things that seem of such great importance is reduced to keeping Dawn Star happy, sailing, and eating. Camaraderie is high amongst the crew and you build personal connections instead of online ones. The longer you stay out, the more perspective you gain on life and what it's really all about. Whether you go to sea, climb a mountain, or simply find a quiet place to call your own, everyone needs this experience every so often in order to stay human.
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> Today's special event was a pod of 10 or so pilot wales, which came up behind Dawn Star and shadowed us on and off for the better part of an hour. In the break between visits, a pod of dolphins played alongside, rolling up at us to see what kind of creature had joined them in their playground this morning. It seems that this must be were all those podcasts are coming from.
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